Visualisation software for M3D-C1

M3D-C1 is the state-of-the-art for performing non-linear 3D resistive MHD simulations of tokamaks. I was using it to model VDE and disruptions during my postdoc at PPPL with more or less success. One really annoying thing was the lack of visualisation tools, especially for probing the 3D components of the plasma evolution. I thus developed a set of tools (Matlab package) to reconstruct the data from M3D-C1 native output (Finite

Elasticae and Stellarators

Stellarators are weird-looking fusion devices. The reason is that ions and electrons are better confined when the magnetic field is “twisting” around the centre-line of the device called the magnetic axis. In tokamaks, the vacuum field generated by the evenly-positioned toroidal field coils is somewhat “flat”, as shown on the figure below. In order to generate “twisting”, a strong toroidal plasma current (in red in the figure below) is induced

Having a go at Quantum Field Theory

Lectures on QFT I have been asked to contribute to a series of seminars and “informal discussions” about Quantum Field Theory (QFT). The group lead by Jingbo Wang from the Physics department of UWA is indeed interested in the connections between quantum random walks and the discretisation of the path integral formulation of QFT found in Lattice QCD. From the mathematical side, QFT is a fantastic playground for learning about

VENUS-LEVIS

The drift-kinetic code VENUS-LEVIS was designed to simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena related to fast particles in electromagnetic fields. The code uses a 4th order Runge-Kutta method to solve the single particle equations of motion, either in the guiding-centre approximation or following the full particle orbits. The formulation is independent of coordinate choice and handles 3D time-varying electromagnetic fields. The interaction with the background plasma as well as

A billion trillion “clashes” make a plasma

A systematic treatment of microscopic collisions to extend fluid models of plasmas At the microscopic level, binary collisions between charged particles conserve two fundamental quantities, namely momentum and energy. This conservation must be present in fluid models in order to describe the macroscopic evolution of plasmas correctly. A systematic treatment of collisional effects is presented to derive fluid models beyond the usual assumption of “thermal equilibrium”. Such extended models will